Asian Works of Art Auction at Doyle on March 19

  • Chinese Flambé Glazed Porcelain Bottle Vase, Kangxi Period, Height 11 1/4 inches.  Est.  $15,000-20,000

    Chinese Flambé Glazed Porcelain Bottle Vase, Kangxi Period, Height 11 1/4 inches. Est. $15,000-20,000

    Doyle

  • Chinese Celadon Glazed Porcelain Double Gourd Vase, Qianlong Mark and of the Period, Height 7 7/8 inches.  Est.  $12,000-18,000

    Chinese Celadon Glazed Porcelain Double Gourd Vase, Qianlong Mark and of the Period, Height 7 7/8 inches. Est. $12,000-18,000

    Doyle

  • Ch'i Fan, Late Ming/early Qing Dynasty, Fan format, Cherry blossoms, Ink and color on paper, Length 20 3/4 inches.  Est.  $10,000-15,000

    Ch'i Fan, Late Ming/early Qing Dynasty, Fan format, Cherry blossoms, Ink and color on paper, Length 20 3/4 inches. Est. $10,000-15,000

    Doyle

Scheduled during Asia Week New York, Doyle’s Asian Works of Art auction on Monday, March 19 at 10am will present the arts of China, Japan and Southeast Asia from the Neolithic Period through the 20th century. Offerings include porcelain, pottery, jade, snuff bottles, scholar's objects, bronzes, screens, furniture and paintings.

The sale offers selection of fine Chinese porcelain, including a celadon glazed porcelain double gourd vase with the Qianlong Mark and of the Period  (est. $12,000-18,000). During the Ming and Qing dynasties, vases of this form were prized, because the double gourd, or hulu, was widely viewed as auspicious. Double-gourd vases are also known as dajiping (vase of good fortune). This vase is remarkable for its exquisite luminous glaze, which accentuates the graceful curves of its profile

Some of the finest ceramics of the Song dynasty were made at Jingdezhen in north Jiangxi Province. Among these are the thinly potted vessels of fine stoneware with the very attractive translucent glaze of light blue, often referred to as qingbai or ('bluish-white') ware. The decoration of qingbai wares is characterized by quickly incised designs, with combs used to add detail or to structure the background. The sale offers a qingbai lobed dish with a distinguished provenance, having been exhibited at the Oriental Ceramic Society in London, as well as at Eskenazi Ltd., London (est. $6,000-8,000).

Other porcelains of note include a Kangxi Period flambé glazed porcelain bottle vase (est. $15,000 - $20,000) and a luminous white glazed porcelain bowl with the Yongzheng Mark and of the Period (est. $8,000 - $10,000). A pair of Late Ming Dynasty blue and white porcelain dishes are decorated with moonlit prunus trees below a band of Tibetan characters (est. $5,000-7,000).

Examples of Chinese cloisonné enamel feature a pair of Qianlong Period figures of hawks dramatically depicted with outstretched wings grasping rockery, height 14 1/2 inches (est. $7,000-10,000).

The sale offers a group of masterful fan paintings, including a work Late Ming/Early Qing Dynasty work by Ch'i Fan depicting cherry blossoms (est. $10,000 - $15,000) and another by Tuan Chu dating to the Ming Dynasty, Cheng-Te Period (1506-1521) depicting figures in a mountainous landscape (est. $6,000-9,000).

Chinese artist Huang Yongyu (b. 1924) specializes in colored ink paintings in which he reinterprets traditional Chinese painting, incorporating fresh themes and techniques, as in a hanging scroll depicting a man seated before a mirror (est. $7,000-9,000).

The public is invited to the exhibition on view March 16 through 18. Doyle is located at 175 East 87th Street in Manhattan. View the catalogue and bid online at Doyle.com